18 Things the Public Don’t Believe but Are Scientific Fact

By Aaron Stone

The world is full of fascinating phenomena, and through the power of science, we are constantly discovering new truths. However, sometimes, these truths seem too difficult to wrap our heads around, and many people fail to believe they’re true. We take a look at 18 scientific facts that you might not believe at first glance:

The Sun is Hotter Than Fire

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The sun’s core reaches a scorching 27 million degrees Fahrenheit (15 million degrees Celsius), which is hot enough to melt any known material. While the sun feels warm on our skin, it is not nearly as hot as fire when we’re near it, which is why people often fail to believe this fact. 

Cold Doesn’t Exist

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Technically, cold isn’t an actual temperature; it’s the absence of heat, a form of energy. Absolute zero (-273.15°C or -459.67°F) is where all atomic motion stops as it would have no kinetic energy.

The Earth Hums

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Our planet constantly vibrates with a low-frequency hum. This “hum” is caused by ocean waves, wind, and even human activity, but people believe it isn’t true as it can’t be heard. 

You Smell Different Throughout the Day

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Our body odor fluctuates throughout the day as the bacteria on your skin break down sweat. As the sweat breaks down, it creates different smells at various times, especially if you wear deodorants and perfumes that are added to the mix. 

You Share Your Birthday with Millions

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With billions of people on Earth, the probability of sharing a birthday with someone in a room of just 23 people is surprisingly high (about 50%). This figure is too difficult for many people to comprehend, so they simply enter denial and insist their special day is for them. 

Your Tongue Tastes More Than Just the Basics

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While we typically associate taste with the five basic tastes (sweet, salty, sour, bitter, and umami), your tongue also has receptors for fats and calcium.

Stars Can Have Their Weather Systems

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Like our sun, some stars have been observed to have giant starspots and solar flares, which could be considered a form of “stellar weather.” Studying stellar weather is relatively young compared to studying the sun, so some deny these facts are true. 

You Can Boil Water in Space

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While water won’t boil at the same temperature in space due to the lack of atmospheric pressure, it can still boil if heated to its boiling point in a vacuum (around 90°C or 194°F).

The Speed of Light is Super Fast

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Light travels at an incredible 299,792,458 meters per second (approximately 186,282 miles per second). It’s hard to imagine anything moving that fast, but Ole Roemer discovered this fact in 1676

We See Most Things in the Past

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Due to the finite speed of light, everything we see around us, from the sun to our coffee mug, is how it appeared a fraction of a second ago.  The vastness of space and the speed of light are difficult for humans to comprehend. Thinking about light-years and fractions of a second can be challenging for some.

You Have Your Own Unique Fingerprint On Your Tongue

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Just like fingerprints, the ridges and bumps on your tongue are unique to you. These unique features are known as papillae patterns. These papillae are the tiny bumps you see on your tongue, and their arrangement is distinct for all of us.

There’s Water Hidden Everywhere

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Even in the driest deserts, there’s water locked up in minerals that hold onto water molecules through chemical bonds. Scientists are exploring techniques to extract this water vapor, which could be a valuable resource in arid regions, much to the surprise of those who thought that water was limited to certain places.

The Earth is Spinning Really Fast

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While it might not feel like it, Earth rotates on its axis at about 1,670 kilometers per hour (1,038 miles per hour) at the equator.

There’s a River Flowing Under the Ocean

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The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is a massive underwater current system that transports warm water from the tropics toward the poles, influencing global climate patterns.

Animals Can Use Tools

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While tool use was once considered unique to humans, many animals, from chimpanzees using sticks to fish for termites to crows using rocks to crack nuts, have been observed using tools in the wild.

The Human Body is Mostly Empty Space

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While it may not feel this way, about 60% of the human adult body is composed of water; the rest comprises various molecules and empty space within cells.

Diamonds are a Bunch of Carbon

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These precious stones are formed from pure carbon atoms, the same element that makes up graphite in your pencil lead, that have been subjected to intense heat and pressure over millions of years.

Black Holes Aren’t Bottomless Pits

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Despite their name, black holes don’t simply suck everything in forever. They have an event horizon, a point of no return beyond which not even light can escape.

What Does the World Really Think of Americans

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It’s obvious that every part of the world has something to say about Americans or knows something about this glorious country. To identify what foreigners think about Americans by leveraging general news articles and social media surveys, we bring you what we found.

What Does the World Really Think of Americans

Examining Historical Presidency: 10 Administrations Marked by Challenges and Criticism

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Unveiling the hidden stories of American presidents, this article reveals lesser-known details that illuminate their successes, failures, and controversies.

Examining Historical Presidency: 10 Administrations Marked by Challenges and Criticism